Today’s Horse Facts: The Haflinger – Always the Same

Horse lovers, do you know what a Haflinger is?

The Haflinger: Always the Same

To see a picture of the Haflinger, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haflinger

“Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever.”

(Hebrews 13:8)

Two theories about the origin of this handsome, friendly, and useful breed have surfaced in recent years.

Some horse enthusiasts believe Haflingers came from the Tyrolean Mountains in southern Austria and northern Italy, possibly as far back as medieval times. The breed’s name, in fact, comes from the village of Hafling in northern Italy. (The Italian word for Hafling is “Avelignese” (Ah vale lig nee´ see), the name which some people call the Haflinger.)

Although people sometimes also refer to the Haflinger as a “mountain pony,” he’s a horse. Why was he sometimes called a pony? Perhaps because a type of light mountain pony was first found in the Tyrolean region. That little pony might have been the ancestor of the modern Haflinger.

The second theory is much more complicated, one that horse lovers might not want to take the time to figure out. Some believe the Haflinger descended from a stallion that Louis IV (the Holy Roman Emperor at that time) gave his son Prince Louis of Brandenburg (a city in northeast Germany) as a wedding gift in 1342.

Regardless of the Haflinger’s start, the evidence points to his roots going back hundreds of years. His lineage has been traced to one of seven studs, a beautiful horse named Folie.

As the Haflinger developed over time, during the second half of the 20th Century breeders worked on his temperament, a very important quality of any good horse. Haflinger admirers considered the horse’s attitude so important, they made a quiet, kind nature one of the official breed standards. Thus, no matter how handsome a Haflinger is, if he has a stubborn streak, he’ll flunk an official inspection and be denied his registry.

Some horse organizations recognize two types of Haflingers. One is a shorter, heavier type used as a packhorse and for farm and forestry work for hundreds of years. Even today, the Austrian and German armies still uses Haflingers as packhorses in rough terrain such as the highest Alpines in their countries.

The other type is taller and lighter, used for light driving, under-saddle competition, and pleasure riding. Although they’re very popular as dressage horses for children, they’re still strong and tall enough to carry adults.

There are several national shows for Haflingers worldwide, including those in Germany, Great Britain, and the U. S. One very interesting fact that has nothing to do with riding a horse is that in Germany the Haflinger produces the majority of the horse milk consumed. How would you like to try some milk from such a handsome horse?

So, how handsome is the Haflinger? The Haflinger is an athletic and sturdy medium-sized horse. Up until the 1940s, he stood at 13.3 hands, but today he stands at between 13.2 and 15 hands. Haflinger breeders shy away from breeding horses shorter than 13.2 hands. However, if a Haflinger is taller than 15 hands, he can be registered if he meets other breed requirements. One of the most important requirements is this horse’s eye-catching color.

You’ll never see a black, white, or spotted Haflinger. This equine is always a chestnut color, the shades ranging from a light gold to a rich golden brown or liver. The mane and tail are always white or flaxen (pale grayish yellow.)  So if you’re looking for a Haflinger, focus on his color first because Haflingers’ color is always the same and will never change.

Do you know something or someone else who’s always the same and never changes?

The Bible tells us that we worship the one true God, who has been the same throughout eternity and will never change. That’s good news for us! We can count on God to guide us with the same godly principles He set in motion from the beginning of time when He created the earth and everything in it.  He wrote all those principles we need to know in His Holy Word.

One thing God never changes his mind about is sin. Some people think they don’t sin. They just think they make mistakes. But God’s Word tells us that everyone has sinned. Because God can’t tolerate sin, he will judge it.

However, the best news ever is that God hasn’t changed his mind about how we can go to Heaven. From the beginning of time, He and His Only Son Jesus decided that Jesus would come to earth to save us from our sins. The decision they made thousands of years ago is still true today.

Aren’t you glad God doesn’t change? You can always trust all the promises in God’s Word that point to salvation and give great peace in a believer’s heart.

PRAYER: Dear God, I’m so glad I can count on you to tell me how to live through your Holy Word that never changes Thank you for never changing. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Read the following verses and decide what they tell us about something God never changes:

Psalm 33:4 

John 3:16

Philippians 4:7 

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  At the end of the 20th Century, the army in India tried to use Haflingers to breed pack horses for mountain work, but the horses couldn’t stand the hot climate, so the program failed.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “For I am the Lord, I change not…” (Malachi 3:6 a).

*****

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS?

THERE ARE OVER 300!

I ONLY SHARED INFORMATION ABOUT 60 IN MY NEW BOOK….

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

Today’s Horse Facts: The Hackney – The Rolls Royce of Carriage Driving

Why is the Hackney horse called the Rolls Royce of Carriage Driving?

The Hackney Horse: The Rolls Royce of Carriage Driving

“And He has on His robe and on His thigh a name written:

KING OF KINGS AND
LORD OF LORDS.”

(Revelation 19:16 NKJV)

(Check out photos of the Hackney at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackney_horse)

The Hackney Horse is another superb breed that originated in Great Britain. He’s not to be confused with the Hackney Pony, which can’t be taller than 14.2 hands and has the usual characteristics of a pony, not a horse.

The first records of any Hackney Horse date back to the 14th Century in Norfolk (a county in eastern Great Britain) when the King of England, Edward III, required excellent trotting horses  to be used for riding. Then in 1542, King Henry VIII ordered his wealthy subjects to breed only the very best trotting stallions.

With excellent crossbreeding in the late 17th to the early 18th Centuries, the Hackney developed from the Norfolk Trotter, Yorkshire Roadster, the Arabian, and the Thoroughbred. Wow! What strong bloodlines this high stepper has!  Before that time, heavier, big-boned horses pulled wagons, and they were in no hurry to do it. However, people wanted to get places faster, so they focused on lighter horses such as the Hackney. At first, folks simply admired the beauty of the Hackney but soon discovered his amazing trotting ability and seemingly endless energy. He could cover up to sixty miles in one day!

When people first entered Hackneys in competition, it was “under saddle” (a rider on the horse), not harness. As road conditions improved and the Hackney became the carriage horse, he then competed in harness. Thus, he became known as a riding and driving horse of great excellence.

During the 19th Century as with so many other driving breeds, the invention of modern machinery and the expansion of the railway endangered the carriage horses. Fortunately, Hackney owners revived the breed by selective crossbreeding with Norfolk and Yorkshire Trotters known for their style and speed. The impressive gaits of the Hackney Horse saved him from extinction and began his awesome appearance in England’s show ring.

The Hackney first appeared in the United States in 1878 when a Hackney enthusiast, Alexander Cassatt, brought the first Hackney Pony to the United States. Because Hackneys came in both pony and horse height ranges, they were one of the few breeds that recognized both pony and horse sizes.

As the Hackney Pony developed in the late 19th Century, Hackney Horses were bred to different pony breeds in order to create a very specific type of show pony. In 1891 with the two breeds becoming increasingly distinct in their characteristics, Cassatt and other Hackney enthusiasts founded the American Hackney Horse Society now based in Lexington, Kentucky.

Over the last few decades, the Hackney’s breeding has further produced a horse ideal for carriage driving. The Hackney Horse ranges in height from 14 to 15.3 hands. Their common colors are black, brown, bay and chestnut, and there are even some spotted ones. He has an elegant presence with a small head, well-shaped ears, and a natural high-set tail. But what is the Hackney most well-known for? Of course, his natural high-stepping gait! Although he’s best known for stealing the show in harness, he can also give a smooth and exciting ride. A pleasant surprise is his outstanding ability in show jumping and dressage competition.

To bring the excellence of the Hackney to the world’s horse enthusiasts, in 2003 the American Hackney Horse Society started the Open Competition Awards Program to recognize blue-ribbon Hackneys that were competing against other breeds.

Today proud owners compete in Carriage Driving and Coaching with their Hackney Horses, many driving away with top honors. Horse lovers often have to admit there’s nothing more elegant than a Hackney driving a fancy antique carriage. Because of the Hackney’s royal appearance, it’s easy to understand that he’s called the Rolls Royce of carriage driving.

Do you know what it means to label something a “Rolls Royce”?

The term “Rolls Royce” means the very best of something. A Rolls Royce car is one of the most expensive, special-made cars in the world. As the Hackney is labeled the Rolls Royce of carriage driving, our God and Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, can be labeled the “Rolls Royce of all gods.” He’s not only the best God. He’s the only true God.

Sadly, many people around the world worship gods that aren’t even alive. They worship statues that can’t hear or speak. Some cultures worship animals, believing their ancestors’ souls live in the animals they worship. But saddest of all are the millions of people who believe they can go to heaven if they please their gods by being good or by doing kind deeds. But our one true God doesn’t expect that from us. All our God asks is that we trust in His Son Jesus to be our Savior, the only one who can forgive all our sins.

If you’ve trusted in Jesus as your Savior, then you’re believing in the Rolls Royce of gods, and you always can be sure of heaven when you die.

PRAYER: Dear God, I thank Jesus my Savior for being the One True God, whom I can trust to go to heaven. I realize there are no other gods like Him anywhere.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

What do you think people might be doing to try to earn their way to heaven? Thank God that you know it’s your faith in Christ that opens the way to eternal life.

Take your ride: (Do you know?) In the 1820s, a Hackney called “Norfolk Cob” was recorded as trotting two miles in just five minutes and four seconds.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?” (Exodus 15:11).

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS?

THERE ARE OVER 300!!!! I ONLY SHARED ABOUT 60 IN MY NEW BOOK….

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

 

If you like to read stories about kids and horses, then my Keystone Stables books are the ones for you!

Today’s Horse Facts: The Gypsy Vanner – The Horse with Many Names

Gypsy Vanner Horses have gained popularity with horse lovers worldwide only recently. But what is a Gypsy Vanner?

The Gypsy Vanner: The Horse with Many Names

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_horse)

“Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth.”

(Philippians 2:9-10)

Gypsy Vanner Horses have gained popularity with horse lovers worldwide only recently. However, the Romani people (nomads) of Great Britain have known of this breed since the mid- 19th Century.  In fact, those travelers were instrumental in developing this special horse over the next fifty years. Through the crossbreeding of Dales Ponies (known as strong draft pullers), Fell Ponies, Shires, and Clydesdales, the short but stocky and powerful Gypsy horse emerged. The wandering groups finally had the perfect horse to pull their vardoes, also known as caravans (little houses on wheels).

A Gypsy Horse received special training to pull a vardo. Going up a steep hill, he had to learn to keep pulling the vardo until he reached the pinnacle; otherwise, because of the weight of the vardo, the horse might not have been able to get started again. During training, an old hat was sometimes placed on a frightened horse’s head. That kept him from seeing backward over the top of his blinders at the wagon looming at his back and spooking him. Because the horse was so essential to the travelers, he was considered part of the family and interacted with even the children. Thus, only those Gypsies with calm temperaments became vardo horses.

The Gypsy has the body type of much larger draft horses with heavy bones and broad backs, but most of the breed only stands at 14 to 15 hands. He comes in all brown and black colors and all combinations of pinto. A major feature making the Gypsy so handsome is the long-flowing mane, tail, and impressive feathers on every leg from the hock down. Besides his amazing appearance, the Gypsy is friendly and willing to learn.

Gypsies are now being used in all kinds of events. They pull carts and carriages, perform in dressage and show jumping, and they’ve become popular western pleasure horses. Because of his sweet nature, he’s also a wonderful family horse and is a great trail horse or therapy equine. In the U. S., the Gypsy horse is used in many equestrian sports and does quite well in combined driving and dressage. In 2001, a pair of Gypsies became grand champs in tandem driving team competition (one horse directly in back of the first horse, not side by side).

More interesting than the Gypsy Vanner’s roots is the long list of names this horse has been given: Colored Cob, Gypsy Cob, Irish Cob, Tinker Horse, Tinker Pony, Gypsy Horse, and, of course, the Gypsy Vanner. How in the world did this little horse get so many different names?

Founded in 1998, 2002, and 2003, three different groups of horse lovers, the Irish Cob Society, the Gypsy Cob and Drum Horse Association, and the Gypsy Cob Society of America all decided to refer to the breed as “Cob,” the name they believed the Romani breeders used.

Gypsies are also called “Tinker Horses” or “Tinker Ponies.” Those names originated with breed associations in the countries of Belgium, Sweden, and the Netherlands, where the Gypsies are listed in the Universal Equine Life Number database under the Tinker breed name.

In 2008, the newly incorporated Gypsy Horse Registry of America used the name “Gypsy Horse.” However, this organization states that it recognizes all breed names in use today.

So how did the breed assume the most popular name, Gypsy Vanner?

As early as 1888, the term “vanner,” had referred to a type of horse rather than to a certain breed. Since Gypsies originated as horses used for pulling vardoes or caraVANs, the name “Vanner” became associated with the breed.

In 1996, Gypsies made their way to the United States thanks to horse enthusiasts, Dennis and Cindy Thompson, who weren’t sure the breed had a proper name. They had read about the name “Vanner” being added to the horse’s name in other countries, liked the name, and founded the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society that same year.

While the Gypsy Vanner has seven different names, do you know the Lord Jesus Christ has many more?  The Bible tells us that Jesus has over a hundred different names, and every name exalts Him as the only true God and Savior.

Have you ever heard Jesus called “The Great Creator” or “The Good Shepherd”? How about “The Prince of Peace” or “The Son of God”? These are just a few of Jesus’ many names, all displaying His wisdom, power, and love for us.

Do you have a favorite name for Jesus? No matter which name you choose as your favorite, always remember one of the most important names, “Savior,” the one that offers eternal life to those who truly believe.

PRAYER: Dear God, I realize that the names Jesus has all point to how great and wonderful He is. Thank you most of all, Jesus, for being my Savior.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Read these verses in the Bible and find the names given to Jesus:

Isaiah 7:14;   Hebrews 12:2;   Revelation 1:8

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  Training a Gypsy to pull a vardo began at a very early age with the colt or filly tied with a short rope to the collar of the pulling horse then led along that horse’s side.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace”  (Isaiah 9:6).

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS?

THERE ARE OVER 300!!!! I ONLY SHARED ABOUT 60 IN MY NEW BOOK….

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

Today’s Horse Facts: The Friesian – Majestic!

When a black Friesian prances by in a parade, you can’t help but admire how “majestic” he is. But what is a Friesian?

The Friesian: Majestic!

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friesian_horse)

“His glory is great in Your salvation; honor and majesty You have placed upon him.”

(Psalm 21:5 NKJV)

Have you’ve noticed how many horses are named after places where they were first found? Friesians, sometimes called “Belgian Blacks,” fit into this category. Considered one of the oldest breeds in Europe, the Friesian originated in Friesland, a province in northwest Netherlands. Although he has the strong build of a draft horse and looks like he’d only be used for pulling a plow, he’s graceful and nimble. When he prances by in a parade, people can’t help but admire how majestic he is.

As majestic as the Friesian appears to be now, it’s believed that during the Middle Ages (the 5th to the 15th Centuries), his ancestors were used as war horses. The Friesians’ husky size and strength enabled them to carry knights in heavy armor. During the 16th and 17th Centuries heavy war horses were no longer needed, so Andalusians were crossbred with Friesians to produce a lighter horse for driving carriages.

Over the next 300 years, interest in the breed dropped, and Friesians nearly became extinct. Sadly, at the turn of the 20th Century, there were only three purebred stallions left. The breed struggled to survive, and then, contrary to so many other horses that declined during World War II, the Friesians made a strong comeback. Dutch farmers used them for transportation and farming due to fuel shortages.

Despite the Friesian’s shaky roots, he’s growing in numbers and popularity and performs in all kinds of harness and under saddle competition. Most recently, he’s also making a strong showing in dressage events.

The most unusual fact about the Friesians is they must be black to be registered. However, their colors can also be black/bay, dark brown, and chestnut is sometimes allowed for mares and geldings. If there’s any white at all on a Friesian, it can only be a small star on his forehead.

The Friesian stands at 14.2 to 17 hands. He has a beautiful arched neck and a muscular body with strong, sloping hindquarters. He has a long, thick mane and tail, which are often wavy, and his feet are feathered. He’s known for a brisk, high-stepping trot. Although he’s very energetic, he’s also gentle and trains well.

Friesians come with two different body types—baroque (bah·roke), which has the more solid build of the first Friesians, and the finer-boned sport horse. Although both types are common, the sport horse has become more popular in the show ring.

Because of their gorgeous black coat, flowing mane and tail, arched neck, and high step, Friesians appear in many movies and TV shows, especially in fantasies. They remain calm and perform beautifully when being filmed, and they are stunning in their appearance. A Friesian tends to have great presence and to carry himself with royal elegance. Whether he’s driving a fancy carriage or prancing under saddle, he can only be defined as majestic.

Anyone or anything that is “majestic” has a quality of dignity, beauty, and grandeur. The word “majesty” refers to someone who has great power or a high position. Have you ever heard someone call a king or queen “your majesty”?

The Bible tells us that Jesus is the Supreme Authority of the entire universe and heavens, and we should worship Him as the most powerful ruler of all. Someday King Jesus is coming back to earth on a white horse, and every Christian will have the privilege of bowing in person before Him and addressing Him as “Your Majesty.” I can’t wait for that time to come.

How about you? Is the Majestic God of the Universe the King of your life?

PRAYER: Dear God, I want You to be the ruler of my life. I pray I’ll be a loyal servant, willing to do whatever You ask of me.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Read Revelation 19:11-16 and find four titles of royalty Jesus Christ is called in those verses:

Take your ride: (Do you know?)   Some Friesian events feature the horse driving a sjee, a cart with only two, but very large, wheels.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “To the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever. Amen” (Jude 1:25).

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS?

THERE ARE OVER 300!!!! I ONLY SHARED ABOUT 60 IN MY NEW BOOK….

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

Today’s Horse Facts: The Falabella – A Carbon Copy

Have you ever seen a horse about the size of a Great Dane? The Falabella is one of the smallest horse breeds in the world.

The Falabella: A Carbon Copy

FalabellaFestivo.jpg

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falabella )

“Be imitators of God, therefore, as dearly loved children and live a life of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself for us ….”

(Ephesians 5: 1-2a NIRV)

Have you ever seen a horse about the size of a Great Dane? The Falabella is one of the smallest breeds in the world, averaging seven or eight hands. (Remember a hand is about four inches). The average Falabella is shorter than a yardstick. Because of his size, many people think he’s a pony, but he’s a miniature horse. A carbon copy of the bigger guys!

The Falabella’s roots take him back to Andalusians and Iberian horses in Argentina, South America. In 1868, Patrick Newtall started a breeding program including local Criollo horses known for their stamina. When Newtall died, his son-in-law, Juan Falabella, added the bloodlines of Welsh Ponies, Shetland Ponies, and small Thoroughbreds. Thus, a consistently small horse named the “Falabella” emerged over the next century.

In 1940, Julio C. Falabella, a descendent of Juan, founded the Falabella Horse Breeders Association to preserve the breed. At first, he set the horse’s height standard to no more than ten hands, but later other breeders set today’s standard of about seven to eight hands.

By the early 1950s, horse lovers all over the world became interested in the fascinating little horse. The Falabella gained popularity with not only horse breeders but with royalty and celebrities, as well. These first miniatures arrived in the United States in 1962 when a winery in Etiwanda, California, purchased 12 stallions to drive small stagecoaches in parades. Most of the Falabella miniatures in the U.S. today came from those 12 horses.

Although the Falabellas are the size of ponies, the similarity ends there. Their body shape, sleek coat, and slim frame are very much like Thoroughbreds or Arabs. Falabellas have sturdy bones and a thick mane and tail. Their colors can be black, brown, bay, pinto, and palomino. Strangely, though, there are no Appaloosa-colored Falabellas.

If you think a full-grown Falabella is tiny, a foal is even smaller. If you measure something 24 inches high, you’ll see how little the Falabellas are when they’re born. As small as they are, it takes three years for them to mature.

You might wonder what anyone would do with horses so small. Because Falabellas have a calm, sweet temperament and train easily, they can be ridden by very young children.  But the Falabellas have many other jobs, and they do them well!  They drive carts, and some folks enter the little horses in shows.  In recent years, Falabellas have worked jobs that have won the hearts of young and old alike. One of the horse’s most valuable uses is being guide animals for special needs folks. Falabellas can also be trained as service animals, visiting children in hospitals or the elderly in senior centers.

No matter where the Falabellas live, even in extreme hot or cold, they thrive as much as their taller counterparts. What the big guys can do, the little horses can do, and just as well. You might say these miniatures are carbon copies of the bigger breeds.

A “carbon copy” is something or someone similar or almost identical to another. Has anyone ever said you’re a carbon copy of your mother or father? That means you look just like one of them.

The Bible tells us we should strive to be carbon copies or imitators of the Lord Jesus Christ too. That means as we Christians grow in our faith and love for God, we’ll become more like Jesus in our thoughts, words, and actions.

Have you ever thought you might be considered a carbon copy of Jesus? As you do your best to follow God and please Him, wouldn’t it be great if those around you would think you were a carbon copy of Jesus? If you strive to love others as Jesus loves us, then it might just be the case.

PRAYER: Dear God, I would love to be a carbon copy of my Savior Jesus Christ. Help me to live every day to please Him.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Think of two things Jesus did when He was on earth that showed how much He loved others. Decide how you can show that same love to others.

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  Since 1999, the Guide Horse Foundation has worked to provide miniature horses to the blind in rural areas.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “I tell you the truth, anyone who has faith in me will do what I have been doing ….” (John 14:12a NIRV)

 

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS?

THERE ARE OVER 300!!!! I ONLY SHARED ABOUT 60 IN MY NEW BOOK….

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

 

Today’s Horse Facts: The DUTCH HARNESS HORSE: A High Stepper

“Fancy” is what we horse lovers consider the Dutch Harness Horse. Why?

The Dutch Harness Horse: A High Stepper

Dutchharnesshorse.jpg

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Harness_Horse )

“The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord: and he delighteth in his way.”

 (Psalm 37:23)

For many centuries the Dutch (people from the Netherlands in Europe) concentrated on breeding high-stepping horses. Although farmers valued the horse as a helper and a source of income, they also considered a fancy horse a status symbol. And “fancy” is what we have with the Dutch Harness Horse.

The Dutch have a strong tradition of breeding driving horses. You might wonder what the difference is between a harness horse and a driving horse. There is no difference. The term “in harness” often describes a horse being driven. A horse harness is a type of tack with a breast collar that allows a horse to pull heavy vehicles such as carriages, wagons, or sleighs. The Dutch Harness Horse is noted for pulling lighter, fancier carriages in international competition. But where did he get his start?

During the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, the warm-blooded Dutch Harness Horses were known as “luxury horses.” The first studbook in The Netherlands was founded in 1879, which started classifying them as a recognizable breed. It eventually emerged from two separate equines in the Netherlands. One breed, the northern Groningen, was heavier and had dark coats. The Gelderlander from southern Netherlands was taller and leggier and chestnut in color. Although the resulting horses were stout and could work on farms, they were also elegant with a high step to pull fancy carriages. Owners continued to improve their horses by breeding the best mares to the best trotting stallions. The result? The more streamlined and fancier “Sunday horses” became a separate line from the stronger working horses.

Because of those horses’ classy development, their owners started competing to see whose equine was the showiest. When machines made farm horses unnecessary, the higher-steppers were bred for driving competition. Thus, by 1969, the Dutch Harness Horse became so popular, The Royal Warmblood Horse Studbook of the Netherlands (KWPN) was founded to preserve the breed.

As recent as the late 20th Century, more crossbreeding with Hackneys and Standardbreds resulted in a harness horse with stunning beauty and a natural high step. Today, although only 40 sires and fewer than 2,000 broodmares are registered, the Dutch Harness Horses are very easy to spot.  In the past few years, a few have come to North America and have been crossbred with Arabians, where they are used as sport horses and saddle seat horses. Regardless of how they’re shown, their fancy trot separates them from most other breeds. And there’s a reason why.

The Dutch Harness Horse is unique in that he has strict rules when showing, and it has to do with his feet. The shoes must be within a certain width and thickness, and pads added to the hoof are prohibited. He’s then able to step “to the high heavens” on his own, not because of special shoeing.

Besides his high stepping, the Dutch Harness Horse would have a braided mane and a natural tail in competition. He’d be decked with gorgeous tack, often wearing a white bridle with a cavesson (a noseband) that might match a white carriage. His coat colors can be chestnut, bay, brown, or black. However, he might be gray, a shade of roan, or a creme color. A tobiano paint Dutch Harness Horse surfaces occasionally, but he’d be rare. Regardless of the appearance of this beautiful horse, one fact is certain. He’s proud to be high stepping for the one controlling his reins.

As the steps of a Dutch Harness Horse are in the hands of his driver, so are our steps in the hands of our Driver. Have you ever thought about your life and how each and every detail is planned by our Amazing God?

The Bible tells us that God has a plan for every Christian, and the Lord directs every step in the life of a believer who trusts in God’s wisdom.

Do you pray and ask God for wisdom and for Him to direct your steps? If you have, then God directs your steps through those older and wiser such as a parent, a pastor, or a teacher. Obeying those people will make you a “high-stepper,” allowing the Lord to direct your steps throughout your entire life.

PRAYER: Dear God, I trust you with my life, and I want you to plan my steps. I’m willing to serve you in whatever you ask me to do.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

What do you think might be some “good” steps a young Christian should take in his life? Be determined to take those steps in your Christian walk with Jesus.

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  Branding horses is now illegal in the Netherlands, so the red-lion-standing-on-his-hind-legs brand of the KWPN is found on the left thigh of only older horses. Today, KWPN horses are microchipped instead.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?)  “For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps” (1 Peter 2:21 NKJV).

LEARN MORE ABOUT DIFFERENT HORSE BREEDS.

GO TO https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm

Today’s Horse Fact: The Furioso-North Star: Fearless!

Have you ever heard of a Furioso horse? The Furioso-North Star is a warm-blooded breed named after two stallions that started the line over 200 years ago. 

The Furioso-North Star: Fearless!

Furioso1-250x221.jpg

(Photo compliments Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furioso-North_Star)

“There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear.”

(1 John 4:18a)

The Furioso-North Star is a warm-blooded breed named after two stallions that started the line over 200 years ago.  There’s ongoing discussion whether the breed originated in Hungary or Romania, countries in Europe. Unfortunately, today The Furioso-North Star is endangered with only small numbers in those two countries and Slovakia. Those countries, involved in raising this rare horse for centuries, still have small herds grazing on their grasslands today. Because a few of these horses are only privately owned, the Furioso-North Star is considered a very valuable breed.

So, where did this horse get his start?

A beautiful English Thoroughbred named Furioso was foaled in 1836 at a stud farm in Hungary.  Four years later, he was crossbred with Hungarian mares, which started the line of Furiosos.  At about the same time, another Thoroughbred stallion, North Star, came from England and crossed with Hungarian mares. Those foals became known as the Furioso-North Star driving horses. North Star also sired foals of Norfolk Trotters and with Hungarian Nonius mares. By the end of the 19th Century, the two lines merged and were called Furioso-North Stars.  North Stars produced great harness racehorses, and Furiosos produced excellent heavyweight riding horses.

The Furioso-North Star makes a noble appearance with a strong body. He has the reputation of having a calm temperament and learns quickly. He’s a medium-heavy horse with a large frame that stands at 15.2 to 16.3 hands.  He’s mostly bay but can be chestnut or black. He’s done light farm work, has performed in competition, and has been used in harness.

The Furioso is known as a good quality riding horse especially for one type of rider, the Csikos (CHI-kosh) from Hungary. They would say the Furioso faces any rider’s challenge with a good attitude. The Furioso’s shoulders and legs are muscular and strong enough to hold tremendous weights, even off-balanced ones like the trick-riding Csikos. And the horse does it with no fear!

Why would a horse fear any rider or anything the rider would do? We’re not just talking about any rider.

The Csikos, mounted horse-herdsmen of Hungary, famous all over the world for their trick riding skills, often use the Furioso for their performances. What’s unusual is how highly trained their horses are.

If you know anything about horses, then you know how “skittish” or overcautious most foals are. Many are afraid of loud noises, water in hoses, fire, or any fast movement around their bodies. Even as they mature, horses can fear the saddle or any weight on their backs as well as the bit in their mouth.  We’ll have to admit they’re often big scaredy cats!

However, when trained properly from little up, especially for Csikos trick riders, Furiosos have no fear of anything the riders do. Some riders stand on their heads on the back of the horse, hang off the side of the horse, crawl under the horse’s belly and come up the other side, carry flaming torches, or stand backwards on the saddle, and all of the tricks are done while the horse is galloping around an arena!  The Furioso-North Stars are truly fearless!

Can you say you’re fearless like the Furioso-North Star, or are you afraid of things? How about the dark? Spiders? Snakes? The bully in your school or neighborhood? Were you bitten by a dog once and now you’re afraid of all dogs?

Most people have some fears about all kinds of things, and they might say it’s just part of being human. However, do you know the Bible talks a lot about how we should handle our fears? God wants us to give all our fears and concerns to Him.

You might wonder how to do that. The Bible says to pray and ask God to give you courage then trust in the Lord for peace in your heart that only He can give. If you ask God to take the fears from you, He will. That doesn’t mean the dangers are gone, but you’ll be able to face them with a different attitude. God loves you, and love always takes away fears. With God on your side, you can conquer any fear you face.

PRAYER: Dear God, I know You love me, and I can trust in You to take my fears away. Please help me to always remember that.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Think of some of your fears and ask God to take the fear from you. It might be a good time to discuss your fears with a parent.

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  In 1784, the Hungarian Emperor Josef II founded the stud farm, Mezohegyes, which became one of Europe’s great horse breeding centers.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?)  “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” (Psalm 27:1)

WOULD YOU LIKE TO LEARN ABOUT  59 DIFFERENT BREEDS OF HORSES?

CHECK OUT MY LATEST BOOK:

STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH: A 60-DAY DEVOTIONAL FOR KIDS

https://amzn.to/2Lgypvm