Today’s Horse Facts: English or Western?

July 17, 2015

English or Western?

It’s just one of those known horse facts that I suppose many equestrians ride their horses in the way, or style, they’ve been taught. By style, I mean either English or Western, two distinctly different techniques to ride a mount. By the way, the horse must be trained in either English, Western, or both because the techniques are so different.

Let’s briefly look at these two riding styles so you understand the major differences between them:
English vs. Western
1. English is known as the formal riding style while Western is considered more laid-back. The major difference between English and Western, besides the saddles and riders’ attire, is that with English riding, the rider holds each of two reins with his hands separated, a rein in each hand. In Western, the rider holds both reins in one hand and “neck reins” the horse to turn him left or right.
English.Saddle2. The English saddle is usually lighter and is the “bare necessity” with a thick pad underneath to support the rider. It has no horn (protruding stem) on the front of the saddle to help the rider hang on, and the stirrups hang freely. The Western saddle is much heavier, usually has fancy cut leather, has the horn, and fancy fenders with stirrups on the end.
3. Although the walk and canter are similar, riding the horse’s trot is quite different in both styles. In English, the rider must learn to “post” or raise himself forward out of the saddle with every other beat of the horse’s trot. In Western, the rider “sits” the entire time during a trot.Western Saddle
4. Although Western riding is the most popular for trail riding, both English and Western riding styles are used in show-ring competition. It’s quite easy to spot the difference in dress, though. In Western competition, the riders look like they’re riding the range out West. In English showing, the riders look like they’re on their way to a tea with Queen Elizabeth. However, in both competitions, even in rodeos, contestants are seen wearing helmets, or “hard hats,” to protect themselves from serious injury.

We could go on with other differences in the riding styles, but for a start, let’s say you’ve just gotten “the scoop” on riding English or Western.

 

 

Horse Facts About Horse Care

Horse Facts About Horse Care

The average Joe doesn’t know beans about caring for a horse. Horses need a lot of space, a lot of food, and a lot of TLC. A horse isn’t like a dog that you can keep in your living room or garage, feed once or twice a day out of a soup can or with table scraps, and use a pooper scooper for tiny piles. And when extreme weather conditions enter the picture, a horse owner must know how to take care of that beautiful, expensive equine.

Let’s look at some simple horse facts about caring for your horse in extreme weather:

If you own a horse and if you live anywhere in the U.S.A. that has extremely cold winters AND extremely hot summers, then you probably do keep a watchful eye on your best furfriend all year round. If you’re in the far regions of South America or Australia, then you’re protecting him right now from the blast of winter. Here in northern U.S.A., we’re having extreme heat and humidity for days on end, a VERY dangerous weather pattern for horses. But first let’s discuss how to get your horse through the winter.

If you do live anywhere that has rough-and-tough snowy winters, are you tough and brave enough to ride him in the bitter cold weather? One thing you must remember is to make sure he’s not put in the barn with sweat all over him. Yes, a horse will sweat from a good run, even in the cold weather. Once you untack him, he needs to be wiped clean, groomed, covered with a warm blanket, and put out of the wind or drafts. And make sure he has a nice thick layer of sawdust and/or straw in his stall to keep his feet warm. And give him a little bit of a grain and hay snack to help keep him warm as he snoozes.  Horses are proned to pneumonia, which can kill them in the blink of a lazy eye. So don’t neglect your horse in the winter months.

Now about the summer months. Hot, humid weather can be very dangerous for a horse, especially an older one. On days when the temp reaches the 90s and the humidity causes the heat index to reach 100, a wise equestrian will do his best to shelter his horse from the relentless heat:

1. Lock him in the barn. DON’T let him stand out in the sun.
2. If you have to ride him in the heat of the day, DON’T run him, and don’t ride him long. Keep him in the shade as much as possible.
3. Wet him down often with cool water and bug juice. (Horse flies are more vicious in hot weather, and they can suck the strength out of your horse if he gets numerous bites.)
4. Make sure he has lots of fresh, cool water to drink.
5. Don’t feed him grain during the day. Grain is a heat producer.

Years ago, my older and most favorite horse, Rex, scared the wits out of me. On a hot summer day, I looked out in the pasture to see if he was standing in his stall. (It was an open stall of which he could go in and out).But Rex wasn’t in the barn. He was in the small corral, stretched out on his side and not moving a muscle.

I went bonkers and ran to him, thinking he was dead. Thankfully, he hadn’t died, but he was drenched in sweat and not moving. I immediately called the vet, who told me that Rex was having a heat stroke. The vet said I needed to get Rex up on his feet,  wet him down, and walk him slowly for a while.

Following the vet’s advice, I got Rex aroused, and to make a long story short, he recovered.

After that incident, Rex NEVER had the option to walk out of his stall on a hot, humid day. I made sure he was in the shade with fresh cool water thereafter, and he lived to be the ripe old age of 27.

So, if you have the good fortune of having a horse, pamper him in the cold and the heat and give him a long, happy life with his best bud.

Today’s Horse Facts: A Contest! (and the Morgan)

April 15, 2015

THE CONTEST!

Horse lovers, before reading about the Morgan, check out this contest. You could win $150!

Go to: https://display.engagesciences.com/display/container/d/3e291c68-1458-4a82-9f0b-9c4e1625c858/details

Tell us why you love horses for a chance to win a $150 Horse Lovers Prize Pack!

Submit a 15-30 second video (could be as simple as a video recording on your phone) of yourself telling us why you love horses.

Two random entrants will receive a Silver Prize, and one grand prize winner will receive the Gold Prize.

 

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The Morgan

Morgan Horse

Do you know your horse facts about the Morgan breed?

The Morgan horse is very much like the Quarter Horse in that he can explode into a gallop for a short distance. The Morgan, with its short legs, muscles, and fox ears, also looks very much like the Quarter Horse. How can we tell the two breeds apart?

A Morgan is chunkier than a Quarter Horse, especially in his stout neck. His long, wavy tail often flows to the ground. His trot is quick and short and with such great stamina, he can trot all day long.

So where are the Morgan’s roots?

The horse breed was named after Justin Morgan, a frail music teacher, who lived in Vermont at the turn of the 18th Century. Instead of receiving cash for a debt owed, Mr. Morgan was given two colts. The smallest one, which he called Figure, was an undersized dark bay with a black mane and tail. Mr. Morgan sold the one colt, but he kept Figure, which he thought was a cross between a Thoroughbred and an Arabian. Over the years, he found the horse to be strong enough to pull logs and fast enough to beat Thoroughbreds in one afternoon and eager to do it all over again the same day!

When Mr. Morgan died, his short but powerful horse was called Justin Morgan in honor of his owner. After that, all of Justin Morgan’s foals were called Morgans. The first volume of the Morgan Horse Register was published in 1894. Since then, hundreds of thousands of Morgans have been registered.

If you go Morgan hunting, you will find the breed in any combination of blacks, browns, and whites. Don’t look for a tall horse because all Morgans are between 14 and 15 hands tall, just right for beginners.

If you’re fortunate enough to find a well-trained Morgan, he’ll give you years of pleasure whether you ask him to gallop down a country trail, pull a wagon, or learn to jump obstacles.

Marsha Hubler
(web)www.marshahubler.com
(writers’ tips) www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the Keystone Stables Series

Dear Horse Facts Fans,

For several years we’ve posted all kinds of blogs about horse breeds, horse care, and horse anything. For awhile, we’re taking a break, but we have dozens and dozens of blogs in here about over 50 horse breeds with lots of nice pictures. Browse our past blogs by going to the SEARCH box on the right column. Plug in any horse breed or horsie topic and enjoy the true/false horse facts quiz. Visit some blogs where I wrote about all the horses that enriched my life over the years. And keep on riding!

REX

Rex, my all-time favorite horse, who went over the horsie rainbow bridge a long time ago. I still miss this horse so much.

Visit my website, http://www.marshahubler.com

There is lots of “horsie stuff” there too!

Today’s Horse Facts: Pole Bending and Barrel Racing Review

barrel racing 2

 

Do you know what pole bending and barrel racing are? If you read my last blog post, you do know what they are. Have you seen either at a rodeo? Can you remember what pattern riders use while barrel racing? Let’s find out in today’s true T/F quiz:

  1. Barrel racing originally developed as an event for men.
  2. Pole bending is a timed event that features a horse and one mounted rider running a weaving path around eight poles arranged in a line.
  3. It is believed that barrel racing first saw competitive light in the state of Texas.
  4. In pole bending each pole is 21 feet apart.
  5. Each pole is six feet high with a base of no more than 14 inches in diameter.
  6. Pole bending combines the horse’s athletic ability and the horsemanship skills of a rider in order to safely maneuver a horse through a cloverleaf pattern.
  7. Both boys and girls compete at the youth level in barrel racing.
  8. Pole bending is usually seen in high school rodeos.
  9. In barrel racing, the figure-eight pattern was eventually dropped in favor of the more-difficult cloverleaf.
  10. The measurements of the poles are implemented and endorsed by the National High School Rodeo Association.

pole bending 2

Let me know if you get at least 8 of these questions correct. If so, you are a pole bending and barrel racing expert! Here are the answers:

  1. F    Barrel racing originally developed as an event for women.
  2. F    Pole bending is a timed event that features a horse and one mounted rider, running a weaving path around six poles arranged in a line.
  3. T
  4. T
  5. T
  6. F    Barrel racing combines the horse’s athletic ability and the horsemanship skills of a rider in order to safely maneuver a horse through a cloverleaf pattern.
  7. T
  8. T
  9. T
  10. T

 

For more information about pole bending and barrel racing, check out these sites:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pole_bending

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrel_racing

http://www.nhsra.com/

Happy riding!

Marsha

http:/www.marshahubler.com/

Have you read this amazing book yet?

Book 8. Keystone Stables

The Long Ride Home

The search begins for the parents Skye never knew. But what will happen if she finds them? On a trip to South Carolina with her foster family, Skye gets the shock of her life when the waitress at a local diner seems to recognize her. The woman proves to be Skye’s long-lost Aunt Millie—Skye’s first-ever contact with her flesh-and-blood family! As Skye and Mom and Dad Chambers attempt to track down her real parents with Millie’s help. Skye’s foster sister and best friend, Morgan, struggles with her own family regrets. More is at stake than anyone can imagine—and the outcome is one that only a truly amazing God can bring about.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0310716926/ref=s9_simh_bw_p14_d7_i5?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-4&pf_rd_r=085WVA2PJGWKRS8SZQ24&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1401488422&pf_rd_i=283155

 

 

 

 

Today’s Horse Facts: Pole Bending and Barrel Racing

pole bending 1

 

Do you know how to pole bend and barrel race? Have you ever seen a barrel race at a rodeo? Pole bending is timed event that features a horse and one mounted rider, running a weaving or serpentine path around six poles arranged in a line. This event is usually seen in high school rodeos and 4-H events as well as American Quarter Horse Association and local National Barrel Horse Association shows.

barrel racing 2Barrel racing is a rodeo event in which a horse and rider attempt to complete a clover-leaf pattern around pre-set     barrels in the fastest time. Though both boys and girls compete at the youth level and men compete in some amateur venues in collegiate and professional ranks, it is primarily a rodeo event for women. It combines the horse’s athletic ability and the horsemanship skills of a rider in order to safely and successfully maneuver a horse through a clover leaf pattern around three barrels (typically three fifty-five gallon metal or plastic drums) placed in a triangle in the center of an arena.barrel racing 1

Barrel racing originally developed as an event for women. While the men roped or rode bulls and broncs, the women barrel raced. In early barrel racing, the pattern alternated between a figure-eight and a cloverleaf pattern. The figure-eight pattern, though, was eventually dropped in favor of the more difficult cloverleaf. It is believed that barrel racing first saw competitive light in the state of Texas.

What about pole bending? Setting up the pole bending pattern is crucial to the success of this event. The pole bending pattern is to be run aroundpole bending 2 six poles. Each pole is to be 21 feet apart, and the first pole is to be 21 feet from the starting line. Poles  are set on top of the ground, six feet in height, with no base more than 14 inches in diameter. These are the measurements implemented and endorsed by the National High School Rodeo Association. The purpose of a universal pattern is to be able to track and compare times everywhere poles are run.
Now do you know your pole bending and barrel racing information? For more information about pole bending and barrel racing check out these websites.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pole_bending

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrel_racing

http://www.nhsra.com/

Happy riding!

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

Have you read this fantastic book yet?

Book 7. Keystone Stables

Whispering Hope

A wild horse and an angry young woman. Is there a secret to taming them both? Wanda Stallord is a wild, nasty handful when she first comes to Keystone Stables, and Skye is put off by the teenager’s grungy clothes and thirst for trouble. The former gang member is a lot like Keystone’s other recent arrival, a beautiful but uncontrollable Mustang called Rebel. Skye wants to help Wanda, but she seems interested only in shooting pool and handing out insults. But as she practices the gentle art of horse whispering with Rebel, Skye discovers a key that just might open up for Wanda’s fearful, lonely heart to the healing power of God’s love.

http://www.amazon.com/Whispering-Keystone-Stables-Marsha-Hubler/dp/0310716918/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1400794708&sr=1-1&keywords=whispering+hope

Today’s Horse Facts: The Caspian Horse

Caspian 1

Have you ever heard of the Caspian horse? The Caspian is an ancient breed previously believed to have been extinct for over one thousand years. This breed is probably the most direct ancestor of the Oriental breeds and subsequently that of all light horse breeds. Let’s see how you do in today’s T/F quiz:

  1. Caspian horses generally stand from 39 to 47 inches tall.
  2. The common Caspian horse colors are baygreyblackdun or chestnut.
  3. The Caspian horse is a hot blooded Thoroughbred type.
  4. The Caspian is a small horse breed native to Northern Iran.
  5. The Caspian is the oldest known breed of domestic horse that still exists.
  6. The CHSA (the Caspian Horse Society of the Americas) was formed in 1963.
  7. The Caspian horse is still extremely rare.
  8. The largest population of Caspian horses is in the United Kingdom.
  9. Caspian horses have an incredible jumping ability.

10.   In 2000 there were 540 registered Caspian horses in North America.

Caspian 2

Let me know if you got at least eight of these questions correct. If so, then you are a Caspian horse expert! Here are the answers:

  1. T
  2. T
  3. F   The Caspian horse is a hot blooded Arabian type.
  4. T
  5. T
  6. F   The CHSA (the Caspian Horse Society of the Americas) was formed in 1994.
  7. T
  8. T
  9. T
  10. F    In 2005 there were 540 registered Caspian horses in North America.

Caspian 3

Well, do you know your horse facts about Caspian horses? If you want to learn more, look up these other websites for you to check up on additional facts about the beautiful Caspian horse breed:

http://www.horsenation.com/2013/08/31/10-rarest-horse-breeds/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caspian_Pony

http://www.caspian.org/about-caspians/caspian-history.asp

http://horses.animal-world.com/Light-Horse-Breeds/CaspianHorse.php

http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/horses/caspian/

(All information in this blog is referenced from the above websites)

Happy riding!

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

Have you read this great book yet?

Keystone Stables book 6

Blue Ribbon Champ

A blue-ribbon horse and a boy with Down syndrome teach Skye the meaning of love.
Joey Klingerman is one of the most loving kids you could ever meet, but Skye would welcome a lot less of his affection. This is Joey’s second summer at Keystone Stables, and the outgoing boy has latched onto Skye as his “girlfriend.” Skye finds his attention embarrassing and frustrating.
To add to the frustration, Joey won’t stop pestering Skye to let him ride her horse, Champ. Skye won’t even consider it. No one rides Champ but her.
What does God want her to learn about loving others—including Joey? With the Snyder County Horse Show drawing near, Skye is about to find out.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003U6YAVG/ref=s9_simh_gw_p351_d13_i3?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0RHRT2MF4MF9SYYQACW8&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846

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