The Brandenburger horse has his roots way back in the 15th Century in Brandenburg, a state in northeast Germany.

The Brandenburger: Going for the Gold!

BrandenburgerFreddy.jpg

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

“…the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether. More to be desired are they than fine gold, yea, than much fine gold: sweeter also than the honey and the honeycomb. Moreover by them is the servant warned: and in keeping of them there is great reward.”

(Psalm 19: 9b-11)

            The Brandenburger has his roots way back in the 15th Century in Brandenburg, a state in northeast Germany.  This breed developed out of the need for a good work horse in agriculture. Farmers soon discovered he had no problem thriving in Germany’s climate, whether facing hot summers or harsh winters. So for centuries, this strong horse served its owners mostly by plowing fields and pulling wagons.

In 1922, the Warmblood Breeding Society began to help align farming needs for the horse with proper breeding. Gradually, a stronger but gentle warmblood developed by crossing Hanoverian and Prussian breeds. Right after World War II, a stallion named Komet from Mecklenburg, East Germany, miraculously escaped a horrible enforced castration rule for unapproved stallions in that country. He later sired a series of successful show jumping champions. Eventually, this breed gained a reputation as a fantastic sport horse during the mid-20th Century by crossbreeding Trakehners (TRACK en ners), Hanoveranians, English Thoroughbreds, Oldenburgs, and Holsteiners.

By 1999, 1,927 broodmares and 76 sires had been registered. Germany has long been recognized for its warmblood horse breeding. This horse is a testament to that long tradition of valuable warm-blooded German horses that shine as excellent sport horses as well as farm workers.

The typical Brandenburg is about16.1 hands. He has a medium head, a well-set neck with a long and straight back, and muscled, strong legs. His common color is bay, usually with dark markings on the ankles and legs. Sometimes you might spot a white marking on his forehead, and his coat is often shiny, like a brand-new penny.

This snappy breed is a well-balanced horse with a lively temperament.  Yet, he’s easy going with the tendency to be nervous. He does well at dressage, endurance riding, general riding, and driving. As a warmblood, he’s a combination of the speed and agility of the hotbloods and the heavier build and gentlemanly manners of the coldbloods.

So what do we have today with this gorgeous Brandenburger? Remember, he started out as a lowly farm animal, pulling plows and wagons. But his determination and drive to go for the gold made him a popular breed found in all spheres of riding and driving sports as well as in dressage and show jumping. His ultimate achievement has been his arrival on the Olympic scene, where he’s won more than his share of gold medals.

How about you? Do you have goals in your life that might lead to “gold” someday? Do you know you can go for the gold right now at your age?

The Bible tells us that God’s Word is more precious than gold, and if we spend time reading it, we’ll gain wisdom and knowledge. A wise person makes decisions that bring success in his life. Who wouldn’t want to be successful in any venture he’d try? According to the Bible, those who take special heed to God’s “judgments,” or his Word, will earn great rewards.

So, when you read your Bible, remember that the wisdom you’re learning is more valuable than all the money in the world. You’ll be on the road to success in whatever you strive to do.  And you’ll on your way to winning the gold!

PRAYER: Dear God, I want to be the best at anything you ask me to do. Please give me the desire to please you. Help me to be in your Word every day so I can gain wisdom. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

If you don’t have a regular time to read your Bible every day, now might be the time to decide to do that, which will help you “go for the gold.” When do you think would be the best time for you to have your daily devotional time?

Take your ride: (Do you know?)  Poetin, a Brandenburger mare and blue-ribbon dressage horse, sold for a record amount at a PSI (Performance Sales International) auction in 2003 for three-and-a-half million dollars.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?)  “But He knows the way that I take; When He has tested me, I shall come forth as gold” (Job 23:10).

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SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

Dallis dreams of meeting Snow, a wild Mustang stallion, but everyone else believes the horse is just a figment of her imagination!

http://amzn.to/2GVxhqZ

Today’s Horse Facts: The Australian Brumby

What the Mustang is to the United States, the Brumby is to Australia.

The Australian Brumby: Free as the Wind

A small group of dark-colored horses standing near a dirt road

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

“For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death.”

 (Romans 8:2)

What the Mustang is to the United States, the Brumby is to Australia.

The Brumby is a free-roaming feral horse in The Land Down Under. The word “feral” refers to animals that live in the wild after having been domesticated by humans. The best-known Brumbies are found in the southeast Australian Alps, although herds of them are found in many areas of the country. Most of them roam freely in the Northern Territory in one of the largest herds in Queensland.

Although we would say a group of horses is a “herd,” a group of Brumbies is known as a “mob” or “band.” Brumbies are the descendants of escaped or lost horses, probably dating back to the late1700s. They crossbred with steeds of European settlers, horses from South Africa, Timor Ponies from Indonesia, British ponies and draught (draft) horses, and a large number of Thoroughbreds and Arabians. With all that cross-breeding, today the Brumby just looks like your “average horse,” usually solid colored and stocky.

The first report of an escaped horse in Australia was in 1804. But by the 1840s, it was common knowledge the horses were escaping from settled regions. Perhaps fences were not properly installed, if fences existed at all! Actually, it’s believed that most Australian horses became feral because they were released into the wild and left to fend for themselves. That might have happened when some ranchers abandoned their settlements due to extremely dry conditions and harsh lands, making farming too difficult.

It’s estimated that at least 400,000 horses roam Australia. Wow! That’s a lot of wild horses! Feral horses are considered a moderate pest because they sometimes wander on ranches where they damage vegetation and cause erosion. During drought conditions, they eat the already threatened and limited vegetation and chew the bark off trees. Therefore, trying to manage the large herds has become a complicated issue between ranchers and the government. Unfortunately, being free to run doesn’t offer the best situation for the Brumbies.

Today thousands of Brumbies live in designated national parks in Australia. Sadly over the years, because there were so many wild horses, the government shot thousands until the public outcry convinced agents to use other means to control the herds.  Adoption centers have been established. Occasionally the Brumbies are rounded up and domesticated for use as camp drafters, stock horses on farms, trail horses, show horses, Pony Club mounts, and pleasure horses. High-risk youth (children who have gotten into some kind of trouble with the law) benefit by attending training camps where they work with Brumbies, training them to become safe trail horses.

An exciting time for Brumbies is a catch-and-handle event in stockman’s challenge competitions held throughout the year. Riders on horseback must catch a running Brumby within a time limit of a few minutes. Points are awarded for the cowboys’ care and skill in catching the Brumby and their ability to teach them to lead. The most famous event is probably the “Man from Snowy River Challenge” in Corryong, Victoria, because of the popularity of two movies, The Man from Snowy River and The Man from Snowy River II.

Australians are proud of “their” horse breed’s heritage of running wild. Horse enthusiasts work hard to keep the Brumbie bands free. If you had the opportunity to ask a Brumby what he’d like, I’m sure he’d say the same thing: “I love running free as the wind.”

When you think of Brumbies running free across the mountains and plains of Australia, do you wish you could be one of those horses and run wild and free? Well, there is a way that every boy and girl can be “free,” much more than even the Brumbies.

The Bible tells us that every person since the beginning of time has had the ability, and often the desire, to sin. Those sins make us feel ashamed. But when we accept Christ as our Savior, the bad feelings and guilt of doing those wrong things are wiped away, and we can feel free as the wind in our souls. Even after we become Christians, we can mess up, but that’s the time to ask Christ to forgive us. We then can feel free to start living for Him again and trying to please him every day. All it takes is our sincere prayer, admitting the things we’ve done wrong.

Do you want to be free as those Brumbies? Be determined to do right in every situation and pray for forgiveness. God is willing to forgive and set you free again.

PRAYER: Dear God, sometimes I don’t feel free at all when sin nags me and keeps me tied down. Please help me to forsake the sin, so I can feel free as the wind. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Think of any sin that holds you back from feeling free. Then pray for God to help you rid it from your life. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(SIDEBAR 1:)

Take your ride: (Do you know?) The Brumby was adopted as an emblem in 1996 by a rugby union team called the ACT Brumbies from Canberra, Australia.

(SIDEBAR 2:)

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery” (Galatians 5:1 NIRV).

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Dallis Parker believes Snow, the Phantom Stallion really does exist. But does she ever get to see him?

http://amzn.to/2GVxhqZ

Today’s Horse Facts: The Akhal-teke – Shines like the Stars

The Akhal-Teke is one of the most beautiful breeds of horses in the world.

The Akhal-teke: Shines like the Stars

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

 If you’ve heard of the Akhal-Teke (AH-kuhl TEH-kee), then you are a true horse lover who’s interested in learning all about equines. Most folks, even horse enthusiasts, have never heard of this breed.

 The Akhal-Teke is one of the most stunning horses God ever created. If you’ve ever seen one in person or even in a photo, you might have thought someone had sprayed this amazing animal with metallic paint, no matter what the horse’s color. How did it get its spectacular appearance? Our creative God gave this horse’s coat a gorgeous metallic sheen that almost glitters.

To say the Akhal-Teke is a rare breed is an understatement. It’s believed to be one of the oldest and purest breeds, originating from Russia and Turkmenistan, where most are found today. At last count, there were only about 6,500 of these beauties world-wide with about 500 in North America.

When you look at an Akhal-Teke, you might think it’s so delicate, it can’t do anything but stand around and look pretty. But that’s not the case. This horse has proven itself not only in dressage but also in “tough” competition like fox hunting and extreme trail riding. But what catches everyone’s eye is not the horse’s performance. It’s the shiny coat.

Akhal-Tekes can have any solid color of undercoat, but the natural metallic sheen shows best in lighter colors like cremello. In fact, palomino and buckskin Akhal-Tekes are so beautiful, they’re nicknamed “Golden Horses.” In the sun, they shine almost as bright as the stars on a crystal, clear night. Whether an Akhal-Teke is performing in a circus or prancing in a parade, all heads turn toward the horse with the sparkling coat.

If you are a Christian, do you ever wonder how you could “shine for Jesus?” Maybe when you were little, you sang “I’ll be a Sunbeam for Jesus.” What do you think that means?

Shining for Jesus is something any Christian can do. You might think you’re still too young to do anything that would make you “shine,” but that’s not the case. Even at your age, you can please God by having a good attitude. That’s being wise. You can also help your parents around the house and listen to your Sunday school teacher and pastor in church. Being a good example is the best way to “shine like the stars.” Ask God to help youkissy-smiley-face to be a good example to others and give you the courage to talk to your friends about Jesus. Some day in Heaven, you’ll shine as bright as the stars!

Jesus, the Bright and Morning Star, will help you every step of the way.

“Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens, and those who lead many to righteousness, like the stars for ever and ever” ( Daniel 12:3).

PRAYER: Dear God, please help me to be wise and have the courage to talk to my friends about you. I want them to know Jesus as their Savior. And I would love to shine like the stars when I meet you face to face. Thank you. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP! (What would God have you do now?)

It’s a good idea to have an attitude check every day.

Have you ever told any of your friends about Jesus? Think of some friends you’d like to tell about Jesus.

Things to Think About:

Take your ride: (Do you know?)

Because the Akhal-Teke has been crossbred so much with the Thoroughbred to create a fast, long-distance racehorse, all Akhal-Tekes have a Thoroughbred ancestry.

Dismount and cool down your horse(Do you know?)

“Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).

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BUY THIS NOW AT YOUR FAVORITE BOOKSTORE OR ON AMAZON

SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

SNOW

Dallis Parker doesn’t let kids bullying her at school stop her from finding the wild white Mustang stallion that most people say doesn’t even exist.

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s Horse Facts: My Fourth Horse, a Cute Pony!

My 4th horse was really my 5th horse. So which one was my 4th?

MY FOURTH HORSE

Candy

Well, horse  lovers, I had a blog all ready to post about my fourth horse then I remembered that my fourth horse was really my fifth horse! You’ll see his picture and story next time.

When thinking about my horses down through the years, wango! I suddenly remembered this little pony I bought years and years ago. I think her name was Candy.

My 4th Horse, Candy

Now to this day I don’t know why I bought her because, first of all, she was only a pony and too small for me to ride. Secondly, she wasn’t trained yet. All I can remember about her is that she was so darn pretty, I couldn’t resist when I saw her. I remember lunging her and working with her on a lead rope, but that’s about it. I don’t remember much more about her, like where I got her and when I sold her. I do remember that I didn’t have her for long, but I just enjoyed having her around for a short time, just to love.

Isn’t that just the way it is with us horse facts lovers? We can’t resist a beautiful hunk of horse flesh?

Next time, I’ll tell you about my fifth and sixth horses.

Happy riding!

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

(Buy a horse book for a friend!)

(Learn about my Keystone Stables books at http://www.marshahubler.com )

 

Please check out my latest book:

SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

SNOW 

Dallis Parker has dreamed about owning a wild Mustang stallion

almost her whole life, but most folks say he doesn’t even exist.

But then in a strange encounter, she

meets Snow face to face, and both their lives are changed.

http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Phantom-Stallion-Marsha-Hubler-ebook/dp/B013GUF078/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1443706981&sr=1-1&keywords=Snow%2C+Phantom+Stallion+of+the+Poconos

Today’s Horse Facts: My Third Horse

A memory: Marsha’s third horse from long ago

Today’s Horse Facts

My Third Horse: Lady

You probably won’t understand what I’m about to say if you are young, but when you get “older,” your memory can start to fail you. Duh! Everyone knows that. Anyway, the horse that I thought was my third horse turned out to be my second horse.

Like a dummy, I never marked the dates or the horses’ names on the back of the zillions of pictures I took of all my horses. So I’ve been plowing through all my albums, trying to sort out which horse was who and when I owned each. But I know that the horse in this picture is Lady, who was my second horse.

How do I know? Well, the picture shows a friend riding Lady, a bay grade mare; beside them is my husband Richard riding Moon Doggie, my first horse. So, that proved to me that Lady was my second horse. And Ginger, whom I thought was my second horse, was really my third horse. Now, are you totally confused? And, by the way, does it really matter?

Now, here’s a little bit of info about Lady, who by the way wasn’t a lady in any shape or form. She was an older horse, and you can tell by looking at her ribs sticking out in the one photo (even though I fed her tons of food). By buying an older horse, I thought I was getting a gentle down-to-earth easy rider. Well, Lady was that—kind of. As long as we rode her AWAY from the barn, she was a piece of cake.

However, as soon as we turned her around to head for the barn, look out! We needed a tight rein on her, and we never could run her going home. That little gem of info we found out the hard way.

One Saturday, hubby and I went for a short ride, maybe for an hour. I rode Moon Doggie, and hubby was on Lady. On the way home, we started to lope across a farmer’s field. We were probably a quarter of a mile from our barn.

All of a sudden, Lady took off full speed ahead and hubby couldn’t stop her. All I could see was a brown blur and him yelling, “Whoa, whoa” and yanking on the reins as hard as he could.

Do you know what we found out?

Lady had a hard mouth. You don’t want a horse with a hard mouth.

What’s a hard mouth? All the nerves in her mouth had been so damaged from bits over the years, her mouth had become totally numb to any pressure or pain. When she decided to run, she was unstoppable. What she should have had on her was a hackamore. Of course, I was still learning about horses, so I didn’t know that.

Unfortunately, Lady was so old, I think I finally sold her to the meat market, sad to say. But I’m not really sure of that. All I remember is that she was very old, and she was no fun to ride back to the barn. But, I will hand this to her. She taught me an awful lot about older hard-mouthed horses. The next time I went horse buying, I made sure I rode the horse away AND BACK to the barn.

Marsha's Little Red Barn
Marsha’s Little Red Barn

Happy riding!

Marsha

(Learn about my Keystone Stables books at http://www.marshahubler.com )

 

Please check out my latest book:

SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

SNOW

 Dallis Parker has dreamed about owning a wild Mustang stallion

almost her whole life, but most folks say he doesn’t even exist.

But then in a strange encounter, she

meets Snow face to face, and both their lives are changed.

http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Phantom-Stallion-Marsha-Hubler-ebook/dp/B013GUF078/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1443706981&sr=1-1&keywords=Snow%2C+Phantom+Stallion+of+the+Poconos

Today’s Horse Facts: My Second Horse

The second horse I owned, Ginger, was a beauty, but she had a big problem.

My Second Horse: Ginger

(Early 1970s)

Ginger, Pretty Pinto Walker

Ginger, Pretty Pinto Walker

After I sold Moon Doggie, my first horse ever and still dear to my heart, I bought a greenbroke part Tennessee Walker pinto, Ginger, from a friend whose mare had foaled this pretty little thing.

Ginger was about three years old when I bought her. Now, I want you to know that I was “greenbroke” too. I didn’t know much about horses, especially how to train them. I had only had Moon Doggie, a gentle little Welsh Pony, for about a year when I decided to move on to a bigger, flashier horse.

Well, Ginger certainly was that. She was bigger, and she was flashier. However, if ever a horse could be labeled ADHD, that was Ginger. As pretty as she was, that’s how flighty she was.

Everything scared this poor horse. When I rode her, I had to be constantly on guard because her nerves were ever psyched. Her ears twitched like radar antennae and her eyes searched out every little sound from either side as we went down the trail.

Did Ginger have that nice smooth Tennessee Walker gait? She certainly did, but she was so skiddish, I rarely could kick her up into second or third gear. Even a leaf blowing across her path would spook her, and she’d decide to take a 90-degree turn without letting me know. Whoa, babe! I had to hang on for dear life!

Marsha's Little Red Barn
Marsha’s Little Red Barn

My hubby and a friend had finished building our little two-stall barn to house my equines, so I started looking for a second horse. I kept Ginger for a year or two, but she never improved as far as her spookiness was concerned. I take the blame entirely for that because, as I said, I knew little about training horses, so I sold her to someone who planned to work with her and turn her into a fine, flashy mount.

Nevertheless, I still have fond memories of sweet, scared Ginger, a picture to feast your eyes on but not a horse to rest your butt on.

Happy riding!

Marsha

(Learn about my Keystone Stables books at http://www.marshahubler.com)

 

Please check out my latest book:

SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

SNOW 

Dallis Parker has dreamed about owning a wild Mustang stallion almost her whole life,

but most folks say he doesn’t even exist. But then in a strange encounter, she

meets Snow face to face, and both their lives are changed.

http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Phantom-Stallion-Marsha-Hubler-ebook/dp/B013GUF078/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1443706981&sr=1-1&keywords=Snow%2C+Phantom+Stallion+of+the+Poconos

Today’s Horse Facts: Meet My Very First Horse

I acquired my very first horse, Moon Doggie, quite by accident.

Feb. 5, 2016

My Very First Horse

My Very First Horse

As all child horse lovers, I dreamed about the day I would be able to have my own horse. Only after college and marriage did that dream ever come true for me.

I look back with fond memories on the many horses I owned for about a twenty-year period. I miss those days and consider my horses as lost but never-forgotten best friends.

In this social networking world in which we now live, I really enjoy visiting other horse facts blogs, whose bloggers have shared memorable moments with their equines. So I thought I’d share some of my horsie experiences from long ago. So let’s ride back in time to my very first horse.

Moon Doggie

Riding My First Horse, Moon Doggie
Moon Doggie was safe to ride bareback

Moon Doggie came to me quite by accident. My hubby and I had been married just a short time and had moved to a rural area in central PA where I started teaching third grade and he worked in the accounting department of a state-run special needs facility.

We rented an upstairs from a retired man, Bucky, who was kind enough to already being sharing his home with my widowed aunt and her teenage son. He had enough room in his big house to accommodate hubby and me, too, while we built a ranch-style home on four acres of land about a quarter of a mile away. For practically nothing, Bucky opened his home to us.

On a whim, Bucky bought a handsome pinto Welsh Pony gelding for his one granddaughter for her birthday. I say he bought it on a whim because he didn’t have a barn for the horse and neither did his granddaughter. He also had not discussed it with anyone else, least of all the granddaughter’s mother! I remember the day the horse was delivered in Bucky’s parking lot. Bucky took the horse by its bridle and twenty-foot rope and staked it out in his small yard. All he had to house the horse was his garage, which he used all the time to park his car.

When Bucky’s daughter and granddaughter came to get the “surprise” present, Bucky’s daughter was appalled. “Dad, we can’t take that horse. We have no place to keep it.”

Can’t you keep it in the garage?”

“No way,” she said. “Ken (her hubby) will never agree to giving up his garage for a horse.”

Although the granddaughter was thrilled with the horse, her heart was also broken because Bucky’s daughter insisted that the animal be returned.

Of course, yours truly, being horse crazy since I knew what a horse was, was not about to let a horse, and such a beautiful little horse just right for my size, slip through my fingers.

My hubby and I had a close friend, Bob, who lived several miles away and had built a small shed and fenced-in pasture for his son’s horse but which was unoccupied at the time. Bob agreed not only to keep the horse at his place temporarily, but he also offered to help my hubby erect a small red barn and fence in a pasture on our four acres of property where our home was being built. In about a month, the job was done, and my Moon Doggie moved into his new barn about the same time hubby and I moved into our new house.

Moon Doggie was a sweet little horse, and I can’t remember him having any bad habits other than his favorite gait being trotting, not loping. He loved apples, which he received frequently. I also can’t remember why I ever sold him other than I wanted to get a bigger horse with a smoother second gear. But today I fondly remember my first horse, who sent me on my way to own about fifteen others.

 

Please check my latest book:

SNOW, PHANTOM STALLION OF THE POCONOS

 SNOW

Dallis Parker has dreamed about owning a wild Mustang stallion,

but most folks say he doesn’t even exist. But then in a strange encounter, she

meets Snow face to face, and both their lives are changed.

http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Phantom-Stallion-Marsha-Hubler-ebook/dp/B013GUF078/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1443706981&sr=1-1&keywords=Snow%2C+Phantom+Stallion+of+the+Poconos