Today’s Horse Facts: The Australian Brumby

What the Mustang is to the United States, the Brumby is to Australia.

The Australian Brumby: Free as the Wind

A small group of dark-colored horses standing near a dirt road

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

“For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death.”

 (Romans 8:2)

What the Mustang is to the United States, the Brumby is to Australia.

The Brumby is a free-roaming feral horse in The Land Down Under. The word “feral” refers to animals that live in the wild after having been domesticated by humans. The best-known Brumbies are found in the southeast Australian Alps, although herds of them are found in many areas of the country. Most of them roam freely in the Northern Territory in one of the largest herds in Queensland.

Although we would say a group of horses is a “herd,” a group of Brumbies is known as a “mob” or “band.” Brumbies are the descendants of escaped or lost horses, probably dating back to the late1700s. They crossbred with steeds of European settlers, horses from South Africa, Timor Ponies from Indonesia, British ponies and draught (draft) horses, and a large number of Thoroughbreds and Arabians. With all that cross-breeding, today the Brumby just looks like your “average horse,” usually solid colored and stocky.

The first report of an escaped horse in Australia was in 1804. But by the 1840s, it was common knowledge the horses were escaping from settled regions. Perhaps fences were not properly installed, if fences existed at all! Actually, it’s believed that most Australian horses became feral because they were released into the wild and left to fend for themselves. That might have happened when some ranchers abandoned their settlements due to extremely dry conditions and harsh lands, making farming too difficult.

It’s estimated that at least 400,000 horses roam Australia. Wow! That’s a lot of wild horses! Feral horses are considered a moderate pest because they sometimes wander on ranches where they damage vegetation and cause erosion. During drought conditions, they eat the already threatened and limited vegetation and chew the bark off trees. Therefore, trying to manage the large herds has become a complicated issue between ranchers and the government. Unfortunately, being free to run doesn’t offer the best situation for the Brumbies.

Today thousands of Brumbies live in designated national parks in Australia. Sadly over the years, because there were so many wild horses, the government shot thousands until the public outcry convinced agents to use other means to control the herds.  Adoption centers have been established. Occasionally the Brumbies are rounded up and domesticated for use as camp drafters, stock horses on farms, trail horses, show horses, Pony Club mounts, and pleasure horses. High-risk youth (children who have gotten into some kind of trouble with the law) benefit by attending training camps where they work with Brumbies, training them to become safe trail horses.

An exciting time for Brumbies is a catch-and-handle event in stockman’s challenge competitions held throughout the year. Riders on horseback must catch a running Brumby within a time limit of a few minutes. Points are awarded for the cowboys’ care and skill in catching the Brumby and their ability to teach them to lead. The most famous event is probably the “Man from Snowy River Challenge” in Corryong, Victoria, because of the popularity of two movies, The Man from Snowy River and The Man from Snowy River II.

Australians are proud of “their” horse breed’s heritage of running wild. Horse enthusiasts work hard to keep the Brumbie bands free. If you had the opportunity to ask a Brumby what he’d like, I’m sure he’d say the same thing: “I love running free as the wind.”

When you think of Brumbies running free across the mountains and plains of Australia, do you wish you could be one of those horses and run wild and free? Well, there is a way that every boy and girl can be “free,” much more than even the Brumbies.

The Bible tells us that every person since the beginning of time has had the ability, and often the desire, to sin. Those sins make us feel ashamed. But when we accept Christ as our Savior, the bad feelings and guilt of doing those wrong things are wiped away, and we can feel free as the wind in our souls. Even after we become Christians, we can mess up, but that’s the time to ask Christ to forgive us. We then can feel free to start living for Him again and trying to please him every day. All it takes is our sincere prayer, admitting the things we’ve done wrong.

Do you want to be free as those Brumbies? Be determined to do right in every situation and pray for forgiveness. God is willing to forgive and set you free again.

PRAYER: Dear God, sometimes I don’t feel free at all when sin nags me and keeps me tied down. Please help me to forsake the sin, so I can feel free as the wind. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Think of any sin that holds you back from feeling free. Then pray for God to help you rid it from your life. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(SIDEBAR 1:)

Take your ride: (Do you know?) The Brumby was adopted as an emblem in 1996 by a rugby union team called the ACT Brumbies from Canberra, Australia.

(SIDEBAR 2:)

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery” (Galatians 5:1 NIRV).

*********************************************************************

Dallis Parker believes Snow, the Phantom Stallion really does exist. But does she ever get to see him?

http://amzn.to/2GVxhqZ

Today’s Horse Facts: The Appaloosa – a Blanket of Brilliance

The Appaloosa horse is usually covered with beautiful spots, but he’s not to be confused with pintos.

TODAY’S HORSE FACTS

The Appaloosa: A Blanket of Brilliance

A dark brown horse with a white and brown spotted rump running in a field.

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

“Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.”

(Psalm 32:1)

The splashy Appaloosa is one of the most popular breeds in the United States, so popular it was even named the official state horse of Idaho in 1975. The breed as we know it today is believed to have originated in the northwestern Native American tribe called the Nez Perce way back in the 17th Century. But did this horse get its earliest start in other parts of the world?

Some French cave paintings thousands of years old show “spotted” horses like Appaloosas. In China, the ancient peoples called this horse “heavenly,” and Persians have called him “sacred.”  But here in the westward expansion of our American territory, the colonists first noticed the beautiful breed as the favorite horse of a unique people, who lived near the Palouse River (which runs from north central Idaho to the Snake River in southeast Washington State.) The Nez Perce Indians rode stunning equines—red and blue roans, with spots all over their rumps. The pioneers had never seen anything like this breed of horse that stood between 14 and 16 hands. They started calling him “palousey,” which means “the stream of the green meadows.” Eventually, the name changed to “Appaloosa.”

People who don’t know much about horses often confuse Appaloosas with Pintos, thinking they are the same, but they certainly aren’t. Although “Apps” are known for the blankets on their rumps, there are ten different patterns of spots found on Appaloosas. They can have spots all over their dark or light-colored bodies. But an App must also have some characteristics quite unique to be registered as an official pureblood Appaloosa: striped hooves, spotted skin around his eyes and lips, and a white outer coat called a sclera encircling his brown or blue eyes.

If you want to buy a gorgeous Appaloosa mare and her foal, you might be surprised to see the foal with a solid coat. Therefore, it’s not always easy to predict a grown App’s color at birth. Spot patterns emerge over time but sometimes change over the course of the horse’s life. Apps with a varnish roan or snowflake pattern are two that become more visible as they grow. Some horses, like those with the blanket or leopard patterns, tend to stay the same once their spots start to emerge. But one thing is certain. The blanket or “covering” of the Appaloosa makes this husky stock horse a head turner whether he’s competing in western horse shows, strolling down the street in a parade, or ambling on a woodsy trail.

The covering of the Appaloosa makes him a special horse. Do you have a “covering” in your life that makes you special to God?

This covering we call “salvation” is the one God places over every person who accepts Jesus Christ as his or her Savior.  Like a blanket smothering the flames of a destructive fire, God places his covering of love over our sins and smothers them when Jesus comes into our lives and gives us the desire and power to do right.

Do you have God’s covering of love in your life? If you do, then when you struggle with anger, being nasty, or laziness and say you’re sorry, God’s ready to forgive you and cover you with His love.  And when you walk by, others will notice a “blanket of brilliance” that comes from your smiling face and servant’s heart.

PRAYER: Dear God, thank you for covering my sins and giving me a new way of thinking. Please help me to display my “blanket of brilliance” to others. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

Think of some bad habits God is helping you overcome since He’s covered your sins. _______________________________________________________________________________________________

(SIDEBAR 1:)

Take your ride: (Do you know?) Roan is a coat pattern with an even mixture of colored and white hairs on the horse with his head, lower legs, mane, and tail mostly solid colors. The silvering effect of mixed white and colored hairs often creates coats that look bluish or pinkish. Bluish roans are called “blue roans,” and pinkish roans are called “strawberry roans” or “red roans.”

(SIDEBAR 2:)

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “Hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all sins” (Proverbs 10:12).

 

KEYSTONE STABLES BOOKS

SAFE READING FOR KIDS 10 AND OLDER!

 

 

Today’s Horse Facts: The American Warmblood

The American Warmblood: Not a Cold Spot in his Heart

WPT2013-CDI4-Brühe Christian-Cinco de Mayo-3.JPG

(Photo compliments of Wikipedia)

Here’s another American original with his roots as late as the 1980s!  The American Warmblood is usually between 15 and 17 hands high, weighs 1,350 pounds, which is 325 pounds heavier than the average horse breed, and may come in any color, though the solid colors are the most common. All kinds of horses can be registered as American Warmbloods as long as they are of a sport horse or warmblood type. No pure hotbloods or coldbloods can be included in this exclusive club. So what’s a “warmblood type?” And how about a hotblood and a coldblood?

If you go shopping for an American Warmblood, you’d look for a horse that has the registry standards of draft horses (coldbloods), Arabians, and Thoroughbreds (both hotbloods). In other words, the Warmblood is a combination of the three.

Let’s take a time-out and make sure we understand the difference between coldbloods and hotbloods.

Coldbloods are your power horses, those big guys who pull really heavy loads like tree trunks for loggers, plow fields, or plod with a stagecoach behind them in a parade. “The Big Four of the Draft World,” Belgians, Percherons, Shires, and Clydesdales, have the reputation of not only strength but also a laid-back, gentle disposition.

Hotbloods like the Arabians and Thoroughbreds are the complete opposite. They jump at the chance to run fast, have a high-spirited temperament, and, although they’re loyal, can be spooked easily. Hotbloods set their sights on the finish line and chafe at the bit to get there.

Now, back to our Warmblood. He has no major health issues and is usually alert, calm yet energetic, obedient, and eager to please. In other words, he’s just a nice guy. He’s also a multi-tasker. You might buy this breed to ride in dressage, general riding, jumping, or mounted athletics activities; yet, the breed is a very popular draft horse, seen in harness in parades and show competitions.

Wow, a horse so trustworthy, you can sit in a wagon and let him pull you around the countryside or down a noisy street in a parade? There’s a reason he’s called a Warmblood. He’s tender, and he aims to please the folks who love him. In other words, he doesn’t have a cold spot anywhere in his heart.

How about you? Would your friends and family consider you “warm-blooded?” Are you kind and gentle to those around you, or are you a complainer? Do you try your best to please others like the American Warmblood, or do you lose your temper when you don’t get your own way?

This horse has a “warm” servant’s heart and wants to do the best job he can. Maybe you never thought about the condition of your heart before. If it’s “warm,” you’ll try hard to please your family and friends … with a good attitude. However, if there’s a cold spot in your heart, big or small, perhaps it’s time to ask God to help you get rid of anything in your heart that would cause you to disappoint Him and others. The best way to start is to read and study God’s Word. Then God can change you from the inside out.

“May my heart be blameless toward your decrees, that I may not be put to shame.”

(Psalm 119:80 NIV)

PRAYER: Dear God, please help me to have a “warm” heart toward others. Help me to love my family and friends and put their interests ahead of mine. Thank you. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP!   (What would God have you do now?)

List some things you could do for your family and friends to show them and God you have a “warm” heart. _______________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

Take your ride: (Do you know?) Hot blooded horses have lighter bodies and a passion to run more than other breeds, which makes them ideal race horses. But they’re often high strung or fiery tempered. Thoroughbreds and Arabians are the only recognized hot blooded breeds. Cold bloods are large, gentle horses and are descendants of the ancient European breeds used for farming, hauling and other types of heavy work. Draft horses, Friesians, and Haflingers are members of the cold blooded family.

Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me and know my thoughts: And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting” (Psalms 139:23-24).

 *************************************

How about a good horse book to help you pass the time?

 

Straight from the Horse’s Mouth: The American Albino

The American Albino: the first devotional from STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH, my latest book idea for horse-loving tweens. Take a lookie.

STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

A DEVOTIONAL FOR HORSE LOVING TWEENS

Volume One

The American Albino: White as Snow

Image result for albino horse

(Picture compliments of Pinterest.com)

Have you ever seen a pure white horse? Ever touched one? Do you know there’s a difference between an Albino and a plain white horse?
The American Albino, also called the American White, is one of the most fascinating horse breeds. It’s known as a “color breed.” Of course, this gorgeous animal has a white coat, white tail, and white mane. However, it’s different from all other breeds because it has pink skin! If you look closely at any other breed, you’ll see the skin is dark. Besides pink skin and white hair, the Albino also has black, brown, or even blue eyes.
Since this horse is a color breed, it’s often identified with lineage breeds of horses like Arabians, Quarter Horses, Morgans, and Thoroughbreds. You’ve probably seen American Albinos and didn’t know it. They’re used in movies, fairs, and circuses. You might see a white horse in a parade on TV, but the commentator says it’s an Arabian. Old-time Westerns sometimes had the hero riding his white horse into the sunset. Silver, the Lone Ranger’s horse, was an American Albino. Just remember, whatever the linage breed, if the horse is white as snow, it could be an Albino too.
Do you know we can be like the American Albino and be as white as snow?
Maybe you’ve felt real dirty on the inside after you’ve done something wrong like talking back to your parents or telling a lie. Maybe you were nasty to a friend or you were lazy and didn’t want to do your schoolwork or chores. Don’t you just hate when you do those things, and you wish you could change?
I have super news. God’s Word tells us we can change and become as white as snow. Since we can’t be “good” all the time, God made a way for us to be clean on the inside, in our souls. He sent His Son, Jesus, to earth to die so that anyone who believes in Him has all sin washed away. All we have to do is ask Jesus to forgive us and save us, and he will. Even after we become a Christian and do wrong and feel dirty inside, He’s ready to forgive again and again if we only ask.
If you’ve never asked Jesus to wash your sins away and make you white as an American Albino, there’s no better time than right now. We can’t get to Heaven by being good. No one is THAT good. It’s only because Christ’s perfect blood washes us white as snow that we can go to Heaven when we die. Make sure today. Ask Jesus to save you, and you’ll forever be glad you did. Whenever you see an Albino, you can think of the special day you asked Jesus to come into your life and make you as white as snow.

“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.”
(Isaiah 1:18)
PRAYER: Dear God, I’m sorry for all my sin, especially when I have a bad attitude. Today I ask Jesus to save me and make me ready for Heaven. I accept Him as my personal Savior. I know He can make me as white as snow on my inside. Show me how to become a better person, and how to choose the right things. Thank you. In Jesus’ name, amen.

SADDLE UP! (What would God have you do now?)
If you’ve asked Jesus to save you, do you think you should tell anyone?
If you don’t go to church, do you think God would want you to go? Would anyone be glad to take you? Why don’t you ask them?  ______________________________________________

(SIDE BAR 1:)
Take your ride: (Do you know?) Although white horses are sometimes called “albino,” there are no reported cases of a true “albino” horse. The absence of pigment cells called melanocytes causes the white color. All so-called “albino” horses have pigmented eyes, generally brown or blue. In contrast, many albino mammals, such as mice or rabbits, typically have a white hair coat, unpigmented skin and reddish eyes. Despite this issue, some registries still refer to “albino” horses.
(SIDE BAR 2:)
Dismount and cool down your horse! (Do you know?) “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

http://horsebreedslist.com/horse-breeds/119/american-albino

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_%28horse%29

Scofield Reference Bible; New York, Oxford University Press; 1945

******************************************************

Do you love to read about horses?

How about starting with A HORSE TO LOVE, book one in my best-selling Keystone Stables Series:

Foster kid Skye Nicholson hates everyone and everything until she meets a beautiful show horse, Champ, at a foster home and special needs riding academy

keystone-stables-book-1Available at any bookstore on online at Amazon, Zondervan, or Barnes and Noble

Today’s Horse Facts: Straight from the Horse’s Mouth, My Next Book

Take a look at my newest book idea, STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH, a 60-Day Devotional for tweens.

Horse lovers, I’d like to share some exciting news. I’m working on a new horse book (as if 13 aren’t enough.) This one’s a little different from all the rest because it’s a devotional for tween kids. We’re looking at 60 different horse breeds and relating them to characteristics a Christian kid should have in his life to glorify God.  So let’s get started. Each week for a while we’ll feature a different breed of horse after this introductory blog:

STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

horses-mouth

A 60-day Devotional for Tweens

Let’s Go Riding!

Horses and kids. Kids and horses.

What is it with kids and horses?

Many kids think horses are the most beautiful creatures God ever made, even better than puppies!

As a kid, I loved horses that way. I’ve always said I was born with a silver spur in my mouth and have horse blood in my veins. I can’t remember a time I didn’t love horses.

If you’re fortunate enough to have a horse or to be around them (like mucking stalls at a riding academy in exchange for riding lessons), then you know the thrill of climbing on a horse and jogging him around the training ring or trotting down a serene path in the woods. If you’ve done so, I’m sure you’ve treated your mount with kindness, never kicking him in the ribs too hard or slapping him in the face with your reins. In return, he’s given you a wonderful ride you can talk about for hours with anyone who’ll listen without yawning a lot.

When I was growing up, I lived in a small town and couldn’t have a horse, but I dreamed about owning one someday. I read any horse book I could get my hands on, books like Marguerite Henry’s Album of Horses, The Black Stallion and My Friend Flicka. I collected horse calendars, plastic horse models, and all kinds of “horse stuff.” I colored horse pictures and watched TV Westerns along with any movie with horses in it. One Christmas, my parents gave me a “real” leather jacket with fringes all over it. I was in pretend horse heaven!

I finally had the chance to actually ride a horse … well, a pony.  When I turned about ten, my mother took me on Sunday afternoons to a riding stable where I rode Sugar, a Shetland Pony,  in a corral for a half hour at a time. Can you imagine the thrill I had every time I climbed in the saddle? I loved horses so much, I’d rub my hands real hard on Sugar when I had to get off. That way I took home with me that wonderful sweet odor of “horse.” It lasted a few hours (or until my mother made me wash my hands to eat supper.)

As I became an adult, I prayed I’d be able to have a horse of my own. I’m so happy to say that God answered my prayer. Once when I had my own home and a job to afford a horse or two, I had horses for a long time. I have years of wonderful “horse time” memories I’ll cherish forever.MyFifthHorse

Do you know there’s someone else very important in your life who loves horses as much or more than we do?

God loves horses. Do you know there are about 150 verses in the Bible that include the word “horse”? Do you think if God mentioned equines so many times in his Holy Word that he’s also very fond of one of the most beautiful creatures he ever made? But there’s something, or someone, God is much fonder of than horses.

You.

God wants you to know He loves you more than anything in this world. He also wants you to know about Him and His Son, Jesus Christ, who came to this earth over 2000 years ago and gave His life so you could live in Heaven some day.

The best way to learn about God and Jesus is to read the Bible. We call that special quiet time with your Bible “having devotions.” If you are a Christian, then you probably already have devotions every day, and that will help you become a strong Christian with a determination to do right.

So saddle up and get ready to hit the trail. Next time, we’ll look at our first horse, the American Albino, and see what’s so special about that breed.

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

Have you read my Keystone Stables books yet? How about starting with A HORSE TO LOVE, book one in my best-selling Keystone Stables Series:

Foster kid Skye Nicholson hates everyone and everything until she meets a beautiful show horse, Champ, at a foster home and special needs riding academy

keystone-stables-book-1Available at any bookstore on online at Amazon, Zondervan, or Barnes and Noble

Today’s Horse Facts: Lady, My Third Horse

My second horse, Lady, wasn’t a lady at all. Find out why.

Today’s Horse Facts

Lady: My Second or Third Horse?????

Lady, My Second Horse

You probably won’t understand what I’m about to say if you are young, but when you get “older,” your memory can start to fail you. Duh! Everyone knows that. Anyway, the horse that I thought was my third horse turned out to be my second horse.

Like a dummy, I never marked the dates or the horses’ names on the back of the zillions of pictures I took of all my horses. So I’ve been plowing through all my albums, trying to sort out which horse was who and when I owned each. But I know that the horse in this picture is Lady, who was my second horse.

How do I know? Well, the picture shows a friend riding Lady, a bay grade mare.

Lady with Moon Doggie in 1971

Next to them is my husband Richard riding Moon Doggie, my first horse. So, that proved to me that Lady was my second horse. And Ginger, whom I thought was my second horse, was really my third horse. Now, are you totally confused? And, by the way, does it really matter?
Now, here’s a little bit of info about Lady, who by the way wasn’t a lady in any shape or form. She was an older horse, and you can tell by looking at her ribs sticking out in the one photo (even though I fed her tons of food). By buying an older horse, I thought I was getting a gentle down-to-earth easy rider. Well, Lady was that—kind of. As long as we rode her AWAY from the barn, she was a piece of cake.

However, as soon as we turned her around to head for the barn, look out! We needed a tight rein on her, and we never could run her going home. That little gem of info we found out the hard way.

One Saturday, hubby and I went for a short ride, maybe for an hour. I rode Moon Doggie, and hubby was on Lady. On the way home, we started to lope across a farmer’s field. We were probably a quarter of a mile from our barn.

All of a sudden, Lady took off full speed ahead and hubby couldn’t stop her. All I could see was a brown blur and him yelling, “Whoa, whoa” and yanking on the reins as hard as he could.

Do you know what we found out?

Lady had a hard mouth. You don’t want a horse with a hard mouth.

What’s a hard mouth? All the nerves in her mouth had been so damaged from bits over the years, her mouth had become totally numb to any pressure or pain. When she decided to run, she was unstoppable. What she should have had on her was a hackamore. Of course, I was still learning about horses, so I didn’t know that.

Unfortunately, Lady was so old, I think I finally sold her to the meat market, sad to say. But I’m not really sure of that. All I remember is that she was very old, and she was no fun to ride back to the barn. But, I will hand this to her. She taught me an awful lot about older, hard-mouthed horses. The next time I went horse buying, I made sure the horse behaved going away and back to the barn.

Happy riding!

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

P.S. Email me with stories and pictures of your horses.

(Christmas is coming! Buy a horse book for a friend!)

THE KEYSTONE STABLES SERIES

keystone-stables-composite

AVAILABLE ON AMAZON and ANY LOCAL BOOKSTORE

(IF THE BOOK STORES DON’T HAVE THEM, THEY CAN ORDER THEM.)

 Learn about my Keystone Stables books at http://www.marshahubler.com

BOOK ONE: A HORSE TO LOVE

keystone-stables-book-1

Read about foster kid, Skye Nicholson, and her show horse, Champ, and all their exciting adventures.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002U80FZK/ref=series_rw_dp_sw

 

 

My 5th and 6th horses weren’t exactly a lady nor a gentleman.

My 5th and 6th horses weren’t exactly a lady nor a gentleman.

My Fifth and Sixth Horses

My 5th Horse

MyFifthHorse

 

While going through all my picture albums, I’ve discovered that I only have one picture of horse number five, a flighty grey Arabian, whose name I can’t even remember. The reason for that is because I only had the horse on a two-week trial basis (about 35 years ago after we moved to the outskirts of Middleburg, PA), and she only lasted two weeks. Why?

This horse, a pretty little thing, was fine to saddle and bridle, fine to walk beside and fine to ride around the barn. BUT … the minute I tried to take her any distance away from the barn, she would balk and rear up on her hind legs. It only took me one tumble off her back to realize this horse needed some work, and I wasn’t the one to do it, so she went back to its owner. It was a shame she didn’t work out for me because she was a very attractive mount, but she was headstrong; thus, she was no good as a trail horse at all.

My sixth horse was a nice looking black Tennessee Walker gelding. I remember his name, Chico, but I don’t even have one picture of this horse. Why?

Well, this horse was another two-week trial fluke.

Was he pretty as a picture? Yes.

Did he stand to take his tack and let me clean his hooves? Yes.

Was he easy to ride? Yes!

“Well, then, what was the matter?” you might ask.

The first time I rode this horse, everything went as smooth as silk. We had a great time out on the trail. When I got back to the barn, I unbridled him and tied him so I could unsaddle him. I loosened the cinch and walked around the back of him, about four feet from his rump (as I had always been taught to do), and BAM! This old boy, for no reason at all, landed a kick on my hip that, if I had been closer, could have done serious damage. Even at that distance away, he gave me a good wallop, which turned into quite a huge black, yellow, and purple hematoma over the next few weeks.

Well, enough of that. I immediately called his owner, who immediately asked, “Did he kick you?” (Surprise, surprise!) The next weekend, the black Walker, unridden after that, went back to his owner, and I was horseless once again and horse hunting for one or two good mounts.

The plain horse fact to learn from all these horse stories is that you never know what kind of a horse you are buying. He/she might look good on foreign territory, he might be pretty as a picture, and his/her owner might sell you a good line. So, when you find one you like, get the horse on a trial basis with the option to return him/her if the horse has dangerous patterns of behavior. And make sure the deal includes your getting all your money back.

Next time, we’ll discuss my favorite horse of all times, Rex.

Happy riding!

Marsha

http://www.marshahubler.com

(Buy a horse book for a friend!)

(Learn about my Keystone Stables books at http://www.marshahubler.com )

 

Please check out my 8-book best-selling Keystone Stables Series

BOOK ONE: A HORSE TO LOVE

Keystone Stables Book 1

 

Read about foster kid, Skye Nicholson, and her show horse, Champ, and all their exciting adventures.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002U80FZK/ref=series_rw_dp_sw