Today’s Horse Facts: The Tennessee Walking Horse

Today’s Horse Facts: The Tennessee Walking Horse

 

Tennessee Walking Horse

Of the few various breeds of horses I’ve owned, the Tennessee Walker is by far my most favorite horse of all time.

“Why?” you ask. What’s so special about the Tennessee Walker?

Well, let me ask you a question. Have you ever ridden a Tennessee Walking Horse? If not, then you’re missing out on one of the smoothest rides you’ll ever have.

Let’s ride right into our 10-question T/F quiz and see how much you really do know about this fantastic breed:

  1. The Tennessee Walker has its roots in Tennessee as far back as the 1880s.
  2. The first “Walker” was a half Standardbred and half Morgan named Black Allan.
  3. Black Allan was the first “Walker” to refuse to trot but rather wanted to “walk fast.”
  4. This breed comes in all colors and any combination of colors.
  5. This horse’s height usually is between 15 hands and 17 hands.
  6. Because of its smooth gait, this breed is often called the “rocking horse.”
  7. The Walker is a winner in both English and Western riding classes.
  8. The Walker has three motions: the walk, the running walk, and the canter.
  9. Since 1947, a Walker has to have both parents registered as Walkers to become registered itself with the Tennessee Walker registry.
  10. “Soring” is a horrible practice that needs to be outlawed where cruel horse owners apply acids, abrasive substances, nails, or other objects to the feet of the horse to make him high step
Ginger, One of my Tenn. Walkers

Answers:

  1.  T
  2.  T
  3.  T
  4.  T
  5.  T
  6.  T
  7.  T
  8.  T
  9.  T
  10.  T

Yep, in case you didn’t notice, all the answers are true in this blog. If you got seven or more correct, then you really know your stuff about Tennessee Walkers. And I’ll make a safe bet that if you ever rode one, you couldn’t believe how smooth the ride was.

If you want to learn more about this special breed, check out more information at these websites:

http://www.twhbea.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Walker

Next time we’ll take a look at probably the most well-known breed of horse, the American Quarter Horse.

Happy riding!

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4 thoughts on “Today’s Horse Facts: The Tennessee Walking Horse

  1. I’ve not forgotten your challenge at Montrose last July to “lift the cross of Jesus.” I’ve had a two-foot wooden cross made that I painted white and covered with all kinds of “sparklies” from Michael’s craft store.
    In the back acre of our property, we have dozens of white pine trees that are easily 30 feet tall. Sometimes when the setting sun’s rays are just at the right angle, the rays shoot through there, making the tree trunks look like they’re on fire. I’m going to mount the cross on one of those tree trunks very soon so when the sun’s rays hit the cross, it will illuminate and be a reminder to all who look at it that Jesus paid it all.
    When I get the cross mounted, I’ll send you a picture of it.

  2. Hi i have just rescued a walker and was wondering if you could suggest what type of bit to use! I can not find the owner this horse was left to die!!! I have always used a hack on my QH or just clip on reins. any help would be great. Thankyou

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